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Showing posts from September 3, 2017

Barry White-Practice What You Preach

Barry White-Singer

Barry White, the singer, was born Barry Eugene Carter in Galveston, Texas on September 12, 1944, and grew up in South Central Los Angeles. White was the older of two children. His brother Darryl was 13 months younger than Barry. He grew up listening to his mother's classical music collection and first took to the piano, emulating what he heard on the records.

White has often been credited with playing piano, at age 11, on Jesse Belvin's 1956 hit single, "Goodnight My Love." However, in a 1995 interview with Larry Katz of the Boston Herald, White denied writing or arranging the song. He believed the story was an exaggeration by journalists.


 While White and Belvin lived in the same neighborhood, Belvin was 12 years older than Barry White. He also stated that he had no involvement with Bob & Earl's 1963 hit single "Harlem Shuffle", a song he is credited with producing and in his 1999 autobiography, White confirmed the song had been…

Traffic - Low Sparks Of High-Heeld Boys

Traffic -  The Low Spark Of High-Heeled Boys
Traffic, creators of Low Sparks Of High Heeled Boys, were an English rock band, formed in Birmingham. The group was formed in April 1967 by Steve Winwood, Jim Capaldi, Chris Wood and Dave Mason.  They began as a psychedelic rock group and diversified their sound through the use of instruments such as keyboards like the Mellotron and harpsichord, sitar, and various reed instruments, and by incorporating jazz and improvisational techniques in their music. Their first three singles were "Paper Sun", "Hole in My Shoe", and "Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush". After disbanding in 1969, during which time Winwood joined Blind Faith, Traffic reunited in 1970 to release the critically acclaimed album John Barleycorn Must Die. The band's line-up varied from this point until they disbanded again in 1975. A partial reunion, with Winwood and Capaldi, took place in 1994. Traffic Music Reviews Traffic released The L…

Winter In America - Gil Scott-Heron

Gil Scott-Heron - Jazz Singer,Poet,musician,Author

 "Gil" Scott-Heron, jazz singer, (April 1, 1949 – May 27, 2011 was an American soul and jazz singer, musician, and author, known primarily for his work as a spoken-word performer in the 1970s and 1980s.
Winter in America is a studio album by American vocalist Gil Scott-Heron and keyboardist Brian Jackson. It was recorded in September to October 1973 at D&B Sound Studio in Silver Spring, Maryland and released in May 1974 by Strata-East Records.

The song illustrates the parable that goes...

Put a ring on one finger, the whole body experiences the joy. Cut a finger and the whole body suffers pain. In the song, It is a story fashioned in a metaphor. In the parable, America is the body. 

The opening lyrics...

"From the Indians who welcomed the pilgrims
And to the buffalo who once ruled the plains...", pictures a time of love, nobility and freedom.

The ideas and aspirations of that time was canonized...

...and to the wounds t…

Tom Browne - Funkin' for Jamaica

Tom Browne - Jazz Musician
Tom Browne, jazz musician, (born October 30, 1954 in Queens, New York, United States) is an American jazz musician, who rose to prominence first through his early work with Sonny Fortune, and scored two major hits in 1980 and 1981: the No. 1 US Billboard R&B single "Funkin' for Jamaica (N.Y.)" and the No. 4 US R&B single, "Thighs High (Grip Your Hips and Move)".

Later in 1982 he released a minor hit called, "Fungi Mama (bebopafunkadiscolypso)" which was also recorded on the Arista record label. It reached number 58 in the UK chart.

Tom is perhaps best known for what music icon George Benson said of his “believability in any musical style; his ability to communicate!”. This ability to emerse ones-self into the musical era, style and dreamscape of a composition, and then artistically create as though you are perfectly at home in that location, is a rarity among musicians. Perhaps this ability is resultant of Browne’s …

Ellery Eskelin - The Sun Died

Ellery Eskelin - Jazz Musician Ellery Eskelin, jazz musician, began playing tenor saxophone in 1969 at the age of ten. In interviews he claims his early influences as Gene Ammons, Sonny Stitt, Lee Konitz, Stan Getz and John Coltrane. His mother, organist Bobbie Lee, learned to play music in the Pentecostal church as a teenager, the influence of which carried over into her playing of secular music and also provided a strong and lasting influence on Eskelin. Her playing was characterized by a strong rhythmic feel and a commanding delivery of American songs.

Eskelin's grandfather was the musical director of the church and played the pedal steel guitar in services while performing on the electric guitar professionally in Baltimore during the late 1940s and early 1950s. Baltimore had a rich musical legacy sustained by musicians such as saxophonists Mickey Fields and Gary Bartz. Musicians from New York often passed through Baltimore to perform on the weekly Sunday afternoon Left Bank …

Dollar's Mood (Featuring Hugh Masekela)

Dollar's Moods (Featuring Hugh Masekela) Dollar's Mood, with the help of Hugh Masekela, was recorded in the early 1960s by the first South African band, "The Epistles".  The recording was destined for greater success until the Sharpeville massacre,  an event which occurred on 21 March 1960, at the police station in the South African township of Sharpeville in Transvaal. As a result of the incident, the Government of South Africa declared that people could no longer gather in more than ten people at a time and as a consequence, all tours and concerts were canceled. resulting in the disbanding of the band.  Dollar's Moods-The Jazz Epistles Hugh Masekela, soon after, in 1961, left South Africa and came to the United States where he enjoyed tremendous success during the following years. Back To Hugh Masekela

Kool And The Gang - Summer Madness

Kool And The Gang - Jazz Musicians Kool & the Gang, jazz musicians, is the optic that identifies the era of the 70s and 80s. There was great unrest in the country because of the war in Southeast Asia and the tidal wave of civil unrest following the Kent State confrontation with the Ohio National Guard on May 4, 1970.  In 1969, Kool and the Gang produced three hit singles on the pop and R&B charts of Billboard magazine.  This was the beginning of the "Kool" act that would be hard to follow.
The idea of creating music began in 1964 with Robert Bell who was only 13 at the time, his brother Ronald and five school friends in Jersey City, New Jersey. They created a band called Jazziacs, an instrumental band.
The band stayed on the move and in 1974, released two pace-setting albums, "Light Of The World" and "Spirit Of The Boogie" In 1979, J.T. Taylor joined the band as lead singer. Around this time, the band started working with the offshore influen…

Ohio Players - Funky Worm

Ohio Players - Jazz musicians Ohio Players, the Jazz musicians were an American funk, soul music and R&B band, most popular in the 1970s. They are best known for their songs "Fire" and "Love Rollercoaster".

 Gold certifications, records selling at least five hundred thousand copies, were awarded to the singles "Funky Worm", "Skin Tight", "Fire", and "Love Rollercoaster"; plus to their albums Skin Tight, Fire, and Honey. On August 17, 2013, Ohio Players were inducted into the inaugural class of the Official R&B Music Hall of Fame that took place at Cleveland State University in Cleveland, Ohio.

The band formed in Dayton, Ohio in 1959 as the Ohio Untouchables and initially included members
Robert Ward (vocals/guitar), Marshall "Rock" Jones (bass), Clarence "Satch" Satchell (saxophone/guitar), Cornelius Johnson (drums), and Ralph "Pee Wee" Middlebrooks (trumpet/trombone).

Ohio Players Mus…

Faze-O - Riding High

Faze-O - Jazz Singers
Faze-O, Jazz Singers was a late 1970s funk group based in Dayton, Ohio and produced by Clarence Satchell of the Ohio Players, for whom it was the front band during many live performances.

Their 1977 song, "Riding High", has been sampled by Hip Hop artists Riding High is the first album by the Dayton, Ohio funk band Faze-O. Released in 1977 on Atlantic Records subsidiary label, She Records, it was produced by the Ohio Players.

Faze-O Riding High Music Reviews

They would chart in 1978 with the top ten R&B single, "Riding High". "Riding High" went on to be an often sampled song for many hip hop and R&B acts from the late 1980s onwards.