Skip to main content

Strange Fruit-Billie Holiday




Billie Holiday - Female Jazz Singer

Billie Holiday, jazz singer, probably best known for the song, "Strange Fruit", was born in 1915. The world enjoyed her work, music, and rare talent for nearly thirty years. Her vocal delivery and improvisational skills, not common in the jazz world, was considered an evolution in the art of jazz composition. At the tender age of eighteen, she was already the headline singing in small clubs in Harlem.
In 1935, Billie Holiday began recording with pianist Teddy Wilson. They put together several small jazz groups that included some of the best musicians in New York like Lester Young, Benny Goodman, and Ben Webster.

In late 1937, Holiday had a brief stint as a big-band vocalist with Count Basie. The traveling conditions of the band were often poor; they performed many one-nighters in clubs, moving from city to city with little stability.


Holiday chose the songs she sang and had a hand in the arrangements, I Must Have That Man", "Travelin' All Alone", "I Can't Get Started", and "Summertime", a hit for Holiday in 1936, originating a few years earlier. Basie had gotten used to Holiday's heavy involvement in the band. He said, "When she rehearsed with the band, it was really just a matter of getting her tunes like she wanted them because she knew how she wanted to sound and you couldn't tell her what to do."
in George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess
choosing to portray her developing persona of a woman unlucky in love. Her tunes included "

Throughout the baby boomer generation of the 1930s, and 1940s, Ms. Holiday had tremendous success on labels such as Columbia Records and Decca Records. As a consequence of the demons
that hide just beyond the shadows, by the late 1940s, she, too, suffered legal troubles and drug abuse. These conditions, as they did to many in the music industry, particularly jazz artists, landed her in jail for a short prison sentence where she had a chance to look at the downward spiral of her life and career and to reset objectives.

She was released from prison in the spring of 1948 because of being a model prisoner. Seems she was also wise. Her pianist, Bobby Tucker, and her dog, "Mister", met her. "Mister" leaped on her and she screamed as she was knocked to the ground by the dog.

A woman thought she was being attacked by a mean dog and screamed. This caused a crowd to gather. Ms. Holiday commented that she might as well have called for a get together with the major media outlets. Billie Holiday went on to perform to a sold-out crowd at Carnegie Hall.

At the time of her death, in 1959, drug abuse and hard living had taken a toll on her voice. But like a bright star in a far distant galaxy, although the star is gone, the light still shines.



Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Louis Armstrong - Jazz Musician - is remembered as a towering influence

Louis Armstrong: Jazz Trumpet Player - Singer

Louis Armstrong is remembered as a towering influence in the community of music lovers. He was born August 4, 1901. Nicknamed Satchmo, Satch or Pops. Known as an American jazz trumpeter, composer, and singer, Louis also was an occasional actor. His career covered five decades from the early 1920s to the 1960s.

By virtue of the content of his character, Armstrong was one of the first African-American entertainers to cross the skin color divide that existed in America at the time. To the dismay of many, he avoided publically politicizing his race but stood up for the desegregation of Central High School in Little Rock.

By 1920, a younger generation of players, born after 1900, was emerging, and one name above all others began to be mentioned after 1918 when he first started appearing with Kid Ory's band: a talented trumpeter named Louis Armstrong.

The year 1928 was Armstrong's last full one in Chicago before he moved to New York, an…

Hugh Masekela - African & American Famous Jazz Musician - He is the father of American television host Sal Masekela

Hugh Masekela - African & American Famous Jazz Musician

Hugh Masekela, whose middle name is "Romopolo", was born on April 4, 1939, in Kwa-Guqa Township, Witbank, South Africa. He became a cornetist, composer, and singer. He is the father of American television host Sal Masekela. He is known for his jazz compositions, as well as for writing well-known anti-apartheid songs such as "Soweto Blues" and "Bring Him Back Home".

Hugh Masekela was a trumpeter in the first South African band that was created in the early 1960s. This was the first ever complete band of black musicians to make a record. That recording took place less than Coltrane'sAfrica. Dollar's Moods and Carol's Drive, two pieces from that early album was only re-released for the first time as a CD as recently as 1999.


Masekela is quoted, by Alyn Shipton..."We were only able to do one album. Not very many were pressed and it soon sold out. Then Sharpeville happened and gather…

Damien Escobar | Violinist

http://www.manifest.geimage.com/2017/11/damien-escobar-violinist.html
Damien Escobar | Violinist

Damien Escobar, also known as Dame Esco, is an American violinist. He was previously in the duo Nuttin' But Stringz with his brother Tourie, but has been a solo artist since 2012. His "crossover violin" musical style consists of a mix of classical, jazz, pop, R&B, and hip hop.

As kids Damien and Tourie worked as street musicians, playing at Grand Central Station and on the New York City subways. In 2003, they began playing professionally under the name Nuttin' But Stringz. In 2005, Nuttin' But Stringz won a talent contest at the Apollo Theater. In 2006, Escobar appeared in the film Step Up. Nuttin' But Stringz took third place in the 2008 season of America's Got Talent. They performed at the First inauguration of Barack Obama in 2009[2] and won two Emmys. In 2012, Nuttin' But Stringz separated. Escobar returned to school and got his real estate license…